Le Chêne Chapelle

Step 1:

It starts with a sketch from a photo of an interesting site, and a new project is underway…. Le Chêne Chapelle – the Oak Chapel. We visited this area in Allouville-Bellefosse, France on our trip from Paris to Normandy in 2013. We’ll see what develops.

1CheneChapelleSketch-800

Step 2: After enlarging the sketch by 400% and printing it (20 pages), the outline and background fabric are pinned to the design wall and the fun begins. While at the site in France, I was fascinated with the door that leads to the two chapels inside the large old tree. You must read the story about this tree: click here Le Chêne Chapelle. I worked the photo of the tree door through the Moku Hanga app on my iPad, then sent the modified photo to Spoonflower to have it printed on fabric. If you click on the “Design” tab on their web page you can learn how to create your own photo designs and have them printed. Somehow the enlarged door will emerge as a part of the overall design. Too early to tell. There will also be leaves so it doesn’t look so barren.

2SketchToCloth-500

Chêne Chapelle1

Once traced onto the denim background, I used Dye n Flow to paint it all, using a sponge and opaque Jacquard fabric paint to complete the sky. The painting serves as a guide as I add treatments – appliqué, embroidery, quilting, text etc.

Then I created the bark using wool. The door and tree surface around it is a photograph I took at the site which was altered in the app Moku Hanga on my iPad.

Chêne Chapelle4

Far from finished, I am outlining the shingles with machine stitching. They cover areas of the tree where the bark has worn or weathered away. Not shown are all the structural poles, cables and supports applied by man to keep the tree very much alive and upright. I have completed covering the bark areas with either wool scraps or cheesecloth dyed black. Next, I will add the stairway around the right side and decking at the bottom. Then on to the quilting.

 

About muniqueblog

Wife, mother, retired educator, emerging artist. Mary has lived in 10 states and enjoyed them all ~ Minnesota, Wisconsin, Texas, Illinois, Kansas, Hawaii, California, Utah, Minnesota (return), North Carolina with long term visits to Colorado and Arizona. She likes to travel and create textile art. She has exhibited at the Page-Walker Art Gallery and History Center in Cary, North Carolina; Emerald Art Center, Springfield Oregon; Woman Made Gallery, Chicago, Illinois; Durham-Orange Quilt Show; Minnesota Quilt Show; the Mid-Atlantic Quilt Festival and the Quilt Fest of New Jersey.
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3 Responses to Le Chêne Chapelle

  1. susan says:

    Really admire your work. Would you be kind enough to publish the photo of inspiration? I would like to see the complete process. Happy Quilting!
    Susan

    Like

    • muniqueblog says:

      I have combined several. Four of them are posted on my home page: https://muniqueblog.wordpress.com. There is no way to publish the photograph process as it involves putting parts of pictures together, eliminating some parts… like the leaves, with an app (SnapHeal) and in the case of the door, altering the look in another app filter (Mochu Hanga). I took a course from Susie Monday called Using Your iPad which introduced several app filters for altering photographs to have an artistic quality. My final project will have leaves on the branches like the photograph on the home page.

      Like

  2. Dee Ann says:

    Looking forward to seeing this quilt completed…the process is fascinating…next need to read about the chapel…you are so full of wonderful things!

    Like

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